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Offline Lumi Kløvstad

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So work on my cyberpunk short novel chugs ahead, and in a lull in inspiriation for actual content, I decided to write a description meant for the back of a physical book to see if that jogged anything up.

It didn't.

Not immediately at least.

But, here it is for all to read so you may whet your appetites if cyberpunk is your thing. If you liked Dune or Martian Chronicles, it's a lot like that. If you threw it into a particle collider with Deus Ex Human Revolution.

Summary as follows:

Quote
A common trait of Cyberpunk works is a trend towards the dystopian, a nagging sense of despair that our technology will ultimately fail to save us from our own intrinsically flawed nature. Questions are asked about whether we can remain human as we repair and upgrade our bodies with technology, and blur the line between man and machine to increasingly extreme degrees.

These contribute to a grim setting in a broken world, where for all our skill at repairing and healing our bodies, the soul of man continues to degrade.

Many great works have dedicated themselves to asking the great question: “As we lose our organic components and add machinery, can we remain truly human?”

The Prometheus Engine
asks: “What is so great about being human that you want to limit yourself to being just that?”

A work that tackles themes of cyberpunk, transhumanism, colonialism, and philosophy, The Prometheus Engine takes you to the distant moon of Urd, and into the world of Jack Shaw, a blue collar maintenance worker at the colony of Tagman’s Bluff. A 9-to-5 worker with the boring yet critical job of keeping the water running (and whatever else can be foisted by lazy superiors and coworkers), Jack has precious little ambition and few prospects until a routine maintenance job turns into something completely different. Suddenly armed with a new piece in a cosmic puzzle, Jack discovers there is more to the moon than anyone could have possibly anticipated, and that mankind’s destiny is about to take a sharp turn into the unknowable -- into a realm of ancient gods and conquering empires, new responsibilities, and a choice that will change the fate of an entire galaxy.
How not to be a dark lord: the answer to that is a terribly interesting answer that involves an almost Jedi-like adherence to keeping oneself under control and finding ways to be true to yourself in a way that doesn't encourage the worst parts of you to become dangerously exaggerated and instead feeds your better nature. Also, protip: don't fuck with Alchemy or strike up any deals with ancient Japanese Shinigami gods no matter how tempting the deal or how suavely dressed the Shinigami is.

Offline X

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Re: That one cyberpunk short novel I'm writing has an official summary
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2016, 10:13:07 AM »
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Quote
A common trait of Cyberpunk works is a trend towards the dystopian, a nagging sense of despair that our technology will ultimately fail to save us from our own intrinsically flawed nature. Questions are asked about whether we can remain human as we repair and upgrade our bodies with technology, and blur the line between man and machine to increasingly extreme degrees.

These contribute to a grim setting in a broken world, where for all our skill at repairing and healing our bodies, the soul of man continues to degrade.

Many great works have dedicated themselves to asking the great question: “As we lose our organic components and add machinery, can we remain truly human?”

The Prometheus Engine asks: “What is so great about being human that you want to limit yourself to being just that?”

This is interesting. In fact this is exactly what Ghost in the Shell touches upon. While watching the movies and the series I do find myself asking questions like the above. And of course you might ask yourself; "What does it mean to be human? how do you define 'human'?" Deep stuff really, and yet at the same time, it's very simplistic.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2016, 10:15:21 AM by X »
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